Emirates Scholar Research Center - Research Publishing & Indexing Center

Fasting And Intermittent Fasting: Evidence Based

Conference: 5th International Conference on Quality and Evidence Based in Prophetic Medicine

Keywords: Prophetic Medicine


Abstract

Most people adopted a Western lifestyle, which includes eating several high-calorie meals throughout the day leading to cardiometabolic complications and early onset of chronic diseases. Intermittent Fasting (IF) is an eating pattern, where an individual will alternate between periods of eating and fasting. Several types of intermittent fasting have been adopted. The 16/8 Method where people fast for 16 hours each day (eg. only eating between noon and 8pm), the 5:2 Diet where during 2 days of the week, you eat only about 500–600 calories, the “alternate day fasting” (ADF), where you don’t eat for 24 hours followed by a fed day with no intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting appears to positively impact multiple cardiovascular risk factors including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. The exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Caloric restriction has poor long-term compliance rates and it has been shown that it is easier to adhere to intermittent fasting rather than caloric restriction. Religious origins of Intermittent fasting are found in Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. However, Sunnah and Ramadan fast within Islam bear more similarities to the Intermittent fasting approaches. The impact of intermittent fasting on cardiovascular risk factors (i.e. blood pressure, fasting glucose, and lipid profile) can be still seen during Ramadan without decreasing caloric intake. Sunnah fasting is practiced year-round and includes fasting weekly on Mondays and Thursdays with an additional 3 days of fasting in the middle of the month. Two studies assessed 12 weeks of weekly Sunnah fasting combined with daily calories restriction in older males. Both studies indicated an overall energy deficit of 18% and weight loss of ~3%. Fat mass decreased by about 6% to 8%. Although the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated, intermittent fasting appears to positively impact multiple cardiovascular risk factors including obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. These results should encourage future larger clinical trials to further investigate the efficacy of prescribed fasting regimens and optimize intermittent fasting’s potential to improve cardiovascular outcomes..

988 Views
Scroll to top
Close
Browse Tags